Person:Rev. George Marlow Everhart, DD

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Rev. George Marlow Everhart, DD


 Episcopal Minister, President of Huntsville Female College, 1854-1859

Born:Feb. 9, 1826, Loudoun County, VA
Died:April 26, 1891, Decatur, GA

Notes:

•  "Son of William and Susan (Kalb) Everhart, natives of Loudoun County, Va.; grandson of Christian and Maria Labilla (Greier) Everhart, who lived at Frandenthal, Germany, until they emigrated to this country where they lived first in Pennsylvania, and later in Virginia, and of John and Susannah Kalb, who lived at Loudoun County, Va." - Alabama Biography

•  "He was prepared at Dr. Hagerty's academy, Leesburg, Va., and at Dickinson college, Carlisle, Pa.; was graduated from Emory and Henry college, Virginia, A. B., 1852, and later, A. M. He studied theology under Rt. . Rev. A. C. Cox in Baltimore, 1859-1860, and was ordained a priest in the Episcopal church in 1861. The degree of S. T. D. was conferred upon Dr. Everhart by Columbia college, New York, in 1871." - Alabama Biography

•  "He was principal of the Masonic institute at Germantown, North Carolina, 1852-1854; was president of Huntsville female college, 1854-1859; president of the Nashville female academy, Tennessee, in 1860; rector of Calvary church, Louisville, Ky., until the beginning of the War of Secession; rector of St. Peter's Episcopal church, Charlotte, N. C., during the war, and served as an irregular in hospital work and on battlefields, joining the army whenever a big battle was imminent; was rector of St. John's church, Louisville, Ky., 1868-1872; organizer and rector of Kemper Hall diocese school for Girls, Kenosha, Wis., 1872-1878; rector of Hammer Hall diocese school for girls, Montgomery, 1879-1889; did mission work and established churches during this time at Greenville, Prattville, Opelika; moved permanently to Decatur, Ga., in 1899, but continued his work in Opelika and his connection with the Diocese of Alabama until the time of his death." - Alabama Biography

•  "He was principal of the Masonic institute at Germantown, North Carolina, 1852-1854; was president of Huntsville female college, 1854-1859; president of the Nashville female academy, Tennessee, in 1860; rector of Calvary church, Louisville, Ky., until the beginning of the War of Secession; rector of St. Peter's Episcopal church, Charlotte, N. C., during the war, and served as an irregular in hospital work and on battlefields, joining the army whenever a big battle was imminent; was rector of St. John's church, Louisville, Ky., 1868-1872; organizer and rector of Kemper Hall diocese school for Girls, Kenosha, Wis., 1872-1878; rector of Hammer Hall diocese school for girls, Montgomery, 1879-1889; did mission work and established churches during this time at Greenville, Prattville, Opelika; moved permanently to Decatur, Ga., in 1899, but continued his work in Opelika and his connection with the Diocese of Alabama until the time of his death." On April 23, 1865, Dr. Everhart preached before Jefferson Davis, his cabinet, and many of the chief officers of the C. S. Army, who at that time sought refuge in Charlotte, N. C. It was the last sermon heard by President Davis previous to his capture. During the war, Dr. Everbart published and edited the "Church Intelligencer," at Charlotte, the only church paper published in the South during that period." - Alabama Biography

•  The sermon "at" Jefferson Davis: "The Sunday after his arrival, Davis and his party attended services at St. Peter's Episcopal Church on North Tryon (Charlotte NC). The church, filled with generals, government officials and other notables, an observer said, had a 'congregation the like of which Charlotte never saw before and will doubtless never see again.' The Rev. George M. Everhart preached on the 'folly and wickedness of President Lincoln's assassination.' The preacher observed that 'anarchy threatened the whole American continent with its outbreak of passion, madness, crime and outrage.' Afterwards, Davis wore something of a smile as he said to Colonels Johnson and Harrison, 'I think he preached at me. He seems to think I had something to do with the assassination.'" - Sermon "at" Jefferson Davis

•  He was author of "Josephine and Other Poems," published by Harper & Brothers, New York, 1858. - Alabama Biography

•  Married: June 7, 1853, at Germantown, N. C., Cornelia Adelaide A. Banner, daughter of Constantino Ladd and Mary (Bowman) Banner, who lived at Salem, N. C.; granddaughter of Dr. Andrew Bowman of North Carolina; cousin of Gen. Wade Hampton of South Carolina, who fought in the War of Secession, and of W. P. Bowman, a justice of the supreme court of North Carolina; and a descendant of William Hampton who came to Virginia from England in 1620. - Alabama Biography

•  Father of: 1. Dr. Edgar, A. M., Ph. D., m. Elfrida Keller, Atlanta medical college, Atlanta, Ga.; 2. Mary Sue, m. Robert Cunningham, Decatur, Ga.; 3. George Marlow, Jr., 4. Henry Banner, Decatur, Ga.; 5. Adelaide ; 6. Lay Hampton, lieutenant commander, U. S. Navy, Decatur, Ga.; 7. Emily Ethel, 8. Lawrence, m. Mary Pearl Powell, Atlanta medical college, Atlanta, Ga. - Alabama Biography

•  "The Rev. George M. Everhart, a member of the Tennessee Annual Conference, assumed the duties of President (of Huntsville Female College). He continued in that position till some time in 1859, when he withdrew from the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and joined the Protestant Episcopal Church. While President of the College he, through some means, became possessed of a financial claim, which, in after years, through the courts of the country, he secured, and which so embarrassed the College as to result in alienation from the Church." - West

•  "About the year 1853 the college was completed and ready for pupils. The Rev. George M. Everhar, a graduate of Emory and Henry College, was elected the first President. He was quite a young man. He was zealous, earnest, and successful. The school was an ornament to the city and a blessing to the Church. President Everhart about the year 1860 became dissatisfied with his Church, and resigned his position. While with us Dr. Everhart was largely successful, and left us when in a full tide of prosperity. He has not done so well since. He is now the rector of a small Church in North Carolina. I always love and honored the Doctor, and regretted his departure from us more on his own account than on account of the great loss to the Church." - Rivers

•  Trustee of the University of the South for Alabama - Alabama Episcopal Church

•  Necrological by Richard H. Wilmer: "The Rev. Dr., Everhart too has been called from our midst after a ministry of many years. In early life, he became enthusiastic in the course of education. While yet in the Methodist Ministry, he built up a flourishing female seminary, at Huntsville, Ala. After taking order in the Church, he was for many years principal of the church school at Kenosha, Wisconsin. Thence he came into the Diocese of Alabama, and took charge of Hamner Hall. He occupied his position for some eight years. Nearly two year ago he removed to Decatur, GA., still retaining, however, his canonical connection with the Diocese of Alabama, as rector of Emanuel Church, Opelika. The following resolutions passed at the last meeting of the Vestry of Emanuel Church, Opelika, gives expression to their appreciation of his work among them and their sense of their loss: 'Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God in His infinite wisdom to remove from us our honored and beloved Rector, George M., Everhart, D. D., who died at his home in Decatur, Georgia, Sunday morning, April 26th, 1891, there be it RESOLVED, That the Parish, Vestry and member of Emanuel Church do testify that in the death of our Rector, the Church and community have sustained a great loss. That we are bowed down in grief, and that our love and reverence for our Rector know no bound.'" - Alabama Episcopal Church

•  Church of the Advent (Birmingham, Alabama) the Rev. T. J. Beard, D.D., Rector. "A beautiful memorial to the Rev. George M. Everhart was presented to the church on Easter Day by his daughter Mrs. Robert Cunningham. It consists of a cross, a crown and a star, and is suspended above the alter. The crown, hanging about the cross has many double gas jets. The cross is three feet long and has two rows of jets, which number Dr. Everhart's years, sixty-five. Below the cross is a bronze star, upon one side of which is inscribed: 'In loving memory of the Rev. George Marlow Everhart, S.T.D., born Feb. 9, 1826; died April 26, 1891.' On the other side is written; 'He preached unto them Jesus and the Resurrection,' the last text that Dr. Everhart preached on a week before his death in Decatur, GA." - Diocesan News

•  His son, Lay Hampton Everhart, established connection through Rev George M. Everhart, with two ancestors connected with the Revolutionary War. One (Joseph Banner) was a member from Surry County to the House of Commons of the State of North Carolina in 1779 and another (Gray Bynum) was a Private with North Carolina troops. - Sons of the American Revolution


Related Links:
•  Alabama Biography - History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Volume 3 by Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, © 1921, p. 555.

•  Alabama Episcopal Church - Journal of Proceedings of the Episcopal Church, Diocese of Alabama, 56th Annual Council, printed 1887, pp. 4, 50-1
•  Diocesan News - The Churchman, May 2, 1996, page 589
•  One World - Genealogical information behind ancestry.com membership fee wall.
•  Rivers - Early Methodist Educator, by R. H. Rivers, Southern Methodist Review, Volume 8, Issue 2, 1890. P 223.
•  Sermon "at" Jefferson Davis - Carolina Connoisseur, "Charlotte: Last Capital of the Confederacy" by Allan Maurer
•  Sons of the American Revolution - Connection to his ancestors (information behind wall that requires registration)
•  West - The History of Methodism in Alabama by Anson West, printed in 1803, pp. 659-60.




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