Person:Mary Anne Cruse

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Mary Anne Cruse


 Author

Born:1825, Virginia
Died:1910, Huntsville, AL
Residence:600 Adams Street SE
Member of:Church of Nativity, Episcopal
Daughter of:Samuel Cruse
Sister of:Samuel Ridgely Cruse


Notes:

•  Wrote The Little Episcopalian (1854), Bessie Melville (1858), and Little Grandpa (1888). Moral tales for Children. Also wrote a novel "Cameron Hall" from her southern perspective on the Civil War (1867)

•  "She lived in Huntsville and was author of a novel, "Cameron Hall," published in 1866, a story of the War of Secession which brought her into prominence as an author. She also published several Sunday-school books for children, in which her purpose was to strengthen in the minds of her readers a clear understanding of the teachings of the Episcopal faith. 'The Little Episcopalian' was first published by her in 1854, and was endorsed by the General Protestant Episcopal Sunday School Union and Church Book Society. That book was followed by its sequel, 'Bessie Melville,' and in 1888, by 'Little Grandpa.'" - Alabama Biography

•  Miss Cruse donated the proceeds from her books for the stained glass windows in the Episcopal Church of the Nativity. - Alabama Biography

•  Miss Cruse was never married.

•  "600 Adams Street proved a useful vantage point from which to view history in the making. General Ormasby Mitchel took 517 Adams street as his residence and headquarters, and Union troops set up tents in open spaces all along the avenue. Her book 'Cameron Hall: A story of the Civil War,' presents in fictional form the harsh realities of the Huntsville occupation." - Dictionary of Literary Biography

•  "A list of the books in Cruse's personal library, currently in the possession of descendants, reveals a fascination with theology that apparently motivated her to write moral tales for children." - Dictionary of Literary Biography

•  "Even General Mitchel recognized the severity of the crimes committed in the Union name, writing to the war department in May 1862 that 'The most terrible outrages--robberies, rapes, arson, and plundering--are being committed by lawless brigands and vagabonds connected with the army.' Given these circumstances, the looting scene in Cameron Hall seems well within the realm of possibility." - Dictionary of Literary Biography


Related Links:
•  Alabama Biography - History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Volume 3 by Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, © 1921, p. 437
•  Blood and Irony - Blood and Irony: Southern White Women's Narratives of the Civil War, 1861-1937 by Sarah E. Gardner C. Starting at page 66. Quotes and analysis of Mary Ann Cruse's writing.
•  Dictionary of Literary Biography - First page of a biography and literary analysis is free here and the other eight pages can be purchased (price on 8/5/2012 is $6.99)


The Following Pages Link to this Page:
•  600 Adams Street SE
•  Church of Nativity, Episcopal
•  Samuel Cruse
•  Samuel Ridgely Cruse



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